Famous landmarks like the Arc Du Triumph, the Pyramids of Giza, and the Sagrada Familia have been photographed countless times by photographers from around the world, and they are recognizable to most, if not all, of us. But this collection of stunning aerial photographs gives us a bird’s-eye-view of these places, casting them in a totally new light.

Most of the pictures are of places or things that most of us could easily identify right away. The images illustrate just how much a change in perspective can alter. It’s also worth noting that a few of these sites, like the Pyramids of Giza and the hotels in Dubai, were designed with an aerial perspective in mind. The designs of certain Dubai hotels can only be appreciated fully from above, and some theorize that the Pyramids of Giza were meant to be aligned with the stars in Orion’s Belt.

Although taking photographs from a bird’s actual perspective is possible, most photographers prefer taking pictures like these from hot-air balloons, helicopters, gliders, or very tall structures. A few of the photographs also seem to be taken from altitudes that even birds couldn’t reach. None of this, however, detracts from their epic beauty.

Gallery 2 can be found here. [ 40 photos total ]

Since 2010, San Francisco photographer Shawn Clover has been working on a striking series of then and now composite photos of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. To create the series, Clover collected archival photos of the earthquake’s aftermath. He then replicated the photos himself, down to the location, camera position and focal length (to the best of his estimation). The resulting composite photos hauntingly combine stark images of the earthquake’s devastation with modern scenes of life in San Francisco. [ 25 photos total ]

This looks like a lot of fun. This weekend saw the opening day of the Boryeong Mud Festival at Daecheon beach in Boryeong, about 190 km (118 miles) southwest of Seoul. About 2 to 3 million domestic and international tourists visit the beach during the annual festival, according to the festival organisation. [ 20 photos total ]

This page is currently the most comprehensive information source for visual transition phase ballistics and it focuses on precision ballistic photography. It also emphasizes the importance of firearm safety so please keep your eyes open on what really happens during the moment when gun fires and listen to our warnings. [ 103 photos total ]

Most of the pictures are of places or things that most of us could easily identify right away. The images illustrate just how much a change in perspective can alter. It’s also worth noting that a few of these sites, like the Pyramids of Giza and the hotels in Dubai, were designed with an aerial perspective in mind. The designs of certain Dubai hotels can only be appreciated fully from above, and some theorize that the Pyramids of Giza were meant to be aligned with the stars in Orion’s Belt.

Although taking photographs from a bird’s actual perspective is possible, most photographers prefer taking pictures like these from hot-air balloons, helicopters, gliders, or very tall structures. A few of the photographs also seem to be taken from altitudes that even birds couldn’t reach. None of this, however, detracts from their epic beauty.

Gallery 1 can be found here. [ 56 photos total ]

Reuters photographer Thomas Peter spent time documenting Sochi's Circassian community as the city prepares for the 2014 Winter Olympics. Circassians are a people indigenous to the North Caucasus region, most of whom were scattered across the globe by a 19th century tsarist military campaign that caused the deaths of huge numbers. Many Circassians have called for the killings to be recognized as genocide, and have campaigned against the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics, set to take place in the very same broad valleys and mountain slopes they say hold the bones of their ancestors. A delegation of Circassians hailing from Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Syria, Turkey, Israel, Canada, Germany and the United States travelled to the North Caucasus to visit historic sites of their ancestor's homeland ahead of the Olympics. [ 23 photos total ]

One of the most horrific terms in history was used by Nazi Germany to designate human beings whose lives were unimportant, or those who should be killed outright: Lebensunwertes Leben, or "life unworthy of life". First applied to the mentally impaired, later to the "racially inferior", or "sexually deviant", or merely "enemies of the state" both internal and external. From very early in the war, part of Nazi policy was to murder civilians en masse, especially targeting Jews -- which later in the war became Hitler's "final solution", the complete extermination of the Jews. Beginning with Einsatzgruppen death squads in the East, killing some 1,000,000 people in numerous massacres, later in concentration camps where prisoners were actively denied proper food and health care, and ending with the construction of extermination camps -- government facilities whose entire purpose was the systematic murder and disposal of massive numbers of people. In 1945, as advancing Allied troops began discovering many camps, they found the results of these policies: hundreds of thousands of starving and sick prisoners locked in with more thousands of dead bodies. Evidence of gas chambers, high-volume crematoriums, thousands of mass graves, documentation of awful medical experimentation, and much more. The Nazis killed more than 10 million people in this manner, including 6 million Jews. (This entry is Part 18 of a weekly 20-part retrospective of World War II)

Warning: All images in this entry are shown in full, not screened out for graphic content. There are many dead bodies. The photographs are graphic and stark. This is the reality of genocide, and of an important part of World War II and human history. [ 45 photos total ]

Aerial photo tour across countries and continents with a French photographer Yan Arthus-Bertrand [ 32 photos total ]

A rare winter storm swept across most of the Deep South yesterday, turning roads into sheets of ice, dropping several inches of snow in places, snarling highways, and causing at least five deaths. Unaccustomed to the weather, drivers slid into ditches, abandoned vehicles on highways, and became trapped in miles-long traffic jams for many hours. The National Guard was out, extracting stranded motorists and transporting them to shelters - thousands remain trapped on Interstates around Atlanta today. [ 33 photos total ]

Actually, the moment of victory is wonderful, but also sad. It means that your trip is ended. --Bill Toomey, 1968 Olympic decathlon champion [ 36 photos total ]

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